Fitzg’s Journeys – Richard & William

Fitzg’s Journeys returns today with another intriguing post – Richard & William.

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44 thoughts on “Fitzg’s Journeys – Richard & William

    • Ah, Gisborne haunts us! It was such a vivid portrayal. A new version: tell us more, Prue. Please describe a bit for all. 🙂

      • Gisborne in “Gisborne” as written by Prue (Mesmered) on her blog – well, at least the first 38 chapters????

        That would be perfection

  1. I do remember that judiang recommended we read A Knight in Shining Armor by Jude Deveraux with RA as the lead male character character Sir Nicolas Stafford. I consumed that book in two nights and enjoyed it all the more being able to visualize the knight in full force.

    Another book highly recommended to me is The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. While reading, I could totally picture Richard Armitage as Dawsey Adams. This book is being adapted to film and is now in preliminary development. Although the Dawsey role is not a large one, it is important and could be fleshed out greatly in the hands of a master actor such as Richard Armitage. His fanbase would grow exponentially. I wonder if it would result in the movie’s message board collapsing? 😉

    Now with fitzg’s guestpost, I intend to read The William Monk series! Thank you. 🙂

    • Dawsey Adams would be such a great role: a wee touch of John Standring, but a change from John Porter. And yes, the Knight would be a lovely guilty pleasure!
      Do try the Monk series – the books are excellent. 😀

    • Karen, thank you for your comment. Pitt would also be an excellent role – it would be lovely to see Mr. Armitage in a happy marriage and family, carrying on with his detective work.
      * Anne Perry; the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series is set in late nineteenth century London. Charlotte Pitt, born into a higher social level, has entree to the upper middle and titled classes, and is able to assist in her husband’s investigations. London streets and areas are deeply engrained in even the series’ individual titles.

      • Moving forward in time, I’ve also contemplated his suitability for Inspector Ian Rutledge, haunted by the man he had shot during WWI.

        • Karen, Rutledge was my next choice! 😀 (Referred to below) The pair who publish under the name of Charles Todd. Post-WWI.

          • Now, those I have read. I think Armitage would be stunning as Rutledge because he’s so good at implying things going on his mind via his facial expression. Love the idea of him responding to the dead soldier in his head …

            • Absolutely, servetus! And the Todd mother and son in the Eastern U.S.) present the conversations with the dead soldier so subtle – not at all bizarre. Perfect for Armitage.

              • OK…so what’s the Rutledge story called, please?

                What about the lead character from “Birdsong”? I’ll have to listen to it again to discover his name. Yes, I succumbed and bought a downloadable version of it from Audible!!!. Richard just might be interested in playing the role if he is, in fact, anything like our darling Harry Jasper Kennedy. It was one of Harry’s favourite books, remember? Just kidding.

                Please, please, Grati…send that detailed outline to Richard Curtis and Dawn French.

                I’ve read the Pitt series but not the Monk ones…so that’s going to the reading list now. Certainly can picture him as Pitt. And also as Dawsey Adams.

                And Lord Dameral…yes, please.

                  • Hi fitzg,
                    Ta muchly.
                    Oh, heck…that’s a very antiquated English expression meaning “Thank you very much”.
                    I’ve been trying to work out your nationality? Did I see somewhere that you spelled “humour” just like that – the English and Australian way rather than the American way? or am I mixing you up with someone else? Just wondering but don’t feel obliged to tell me – I know I’m an old “sticky beak”. LOL, Kathryn.

                    • And everyone else was faster than me!

                      I love the Rutledge books, and still haven’t made up my mind about Jamie’s nature…

                      Kathryn, is ta muchly really antiquated??! Eep! I shan’t tell anyone round my neck of the woods if you don’t 😀 Which reminds me, some years ago, a friend in the US got me a copy of ‘Poplollies & Bellibones: A Celebration of Lost Words’ which insisted that many words used locally are officially moribund. Made me wonder what words and phrases I think of as long gone that survive elsewhere!

  2. Visiting your blog for the first time, thanks to todays gif at bccmees wonderful site! I have read this particular Ann Perry mystery (love a good dead body book!) and agree with your visualization of RA as Monk. Also strongly agree with bccmee and fitzg that RA would do Dawsey Adams justice. Have a great day!

    • Welcome Elaine! There’s plenty of punch and cookies. 😉

      I’ve read the Perry series but not Guernsey yet. Seems everybody has beat me to it!

      Thanks for joining us. 🙂

    • Hello Elaine, many thanks for comments. Both the Monk and the Pitt series are so readable, aren’t they? Nothing like a dead body… Odd that Ms. Perry’s series haven’t been dramatised. Perhaps the author is reluctant to give permission. But the success of Morse, Dalziel/Wexford, etc. etc….exactly the right actors and casts.

  3. @servetus, do fit Monk in somewhere on the agenda – it is a very good series. There is another relatively recent Scotland Yard detective whom I’d like to add to my list for Mr. Armitage’s agent…

  4. Hi Fitzg (& Judiang),

    Lovely post again. What role would I like to see Richard Armitage portray?

    Lord Dameral, from Venetia–if only to hear him intone once more “My Dear Delight” sighhhh!

    Edward Rochester, from Jane Eyre–I know they just remade it, but I wasn’t that keen about it. So, I think Richard would make a stunning Rochester in about 5 years when enough time has passed from the current version. Hey, if the tall William Hurt can play Rochester–going against Bronte’s description of Rochester–then so can Richard.

    Harry Kennedy, from The Vicar of Dibley–They’ve stored the sets and could bring them out of mothballs. Richard had even expressed an interest in returning to it. I think the writers could make an interesting go of Geradline adjusting to married life and balancing her commitment to her parishioners, her husband, and herself. Anyway, Richard Curtis (one of the writers), I’ve got an eight episode season detailed outline with some dialogue if you’re interested. Ha!

    Cheers! Grati ;->

  5. Hi Gratiana, thanks for suggestions – what fun to see, as well as hear, a Dameral! How many versions of Jane Eyre have there been? Lost count. There’s always room for a new interpretation of Rochester. But PLEASE let there be a Harry and Gerrie sequel!
    We could start a letter-writing campaign…

  6. Cheers Kathryngaul – Canadian. War bride mother. Have lived, gone to school and worked in England at various times. But 5th gen Canadian (on the Irish side 🙂 ) Hope you will enjoy the Rutledge series!

  7. Ah ha…..I’m a 4th generation Australian with 3/4 Irish ancestry and 1/4 English.
    I should get off to bed as it’s after midnight in my neck-of-the-woods. Bye, Kathryn

  8. Hi Karen, sometimes it seems that trendy phrases come back; I’m amused to hear my son and his friends use “cool”, and “neat”, which I thought went out with my ’60s/’70s gen! Who do they think they are – Hippies?? Beatniks?? 🙂 I do recall “thanks muchly” from England, nicely idiosyncratical.

  9. Now I urgently need to start with Anne Perries series! Oh, I need more time …
    But Fitzg, you don’t know what Pandora’s box you have opened with asking, what roles we would put RA in. (I would put him in almost all good books I ever read ;o) He would never have to worry to be out of work ;o) You know which role I would want him to play most of all, but besides that, I have other suggestions as well:
    E.W. Hornung’s “Raffles” – a nice and clever bad guy for RA ;o) or
    the musical detective Julian Kestrel, created by Kate Ross. (Though Kestrel plays the piano and not the cello, but perhaps freedom in the filming adaption would allow that change ;o)

    • @CDoart, RA as Raffles – a sort of Cary Grant – To Catch a Thief! It could make either a charming series or a film, do you think? I do like a cellist Kestrel! Besides, Mr. Armitage is one actor who wouldn’t look silly in knee breeches and satin coats…

      • RA as attractive gentleman thief, what an image ;o)

        With Raffles, I would most certainly do a (never ending) TV series or a Cinema adaption with lots of sequels. Additions to the existing books would be necessary, like a James Bond, just from the other side of the law ;o)

        Kestrel, in my mind RA already conquered the image I had from the hero before I knew about RA. It is sad that the author died much too early and could not continue her wonderful Kestrel series.

        • @CDoart, rather partial to TV series myself; we see more the actors/performances! It is a shame about the Kestrel author.

    • I keep asking the Lord for more time but He hasn’t granted it yet.  I think He’s telling me “Everybody manages, so can you”!!!!  What do you reckon?

      Why is it that time flies when you’re having fun?  There are never enough hours in the day to fit all the good things in.

      • Oh, how true, Kathryngaul. I would like to read a whole wagon load of books, if I had the time. It is hard to decide sometimes, which one gets ahead of the others and gets a chance to be read ;o) Then I get angry with myself, because I need time to decide, which would be better spent reading ;o)

  10. So, it isn’t archaic? As in, in common usage way back in the early to mid-1900s?
    I’m sorry…..I just assumed it was as I’ve never heard anyone except the older members of my family use it.
    Well, there you go (as said by my darling Harry in a very sexy tone…where is HJK when I’m in need of a hug).
    Hi Karen,
    Well, you know us colonials……..we’re “A Weird Mob” mob (and, yeah, I’m including the Americans and Canadians in my generiosity [how do I find a smiley face when I need one?] LOL). We can sometimes be very traditional and hold onto words and customs we learned from you Brits long after you’ve already dropped them!
    We often teach babies to say “Ta” here when they’re first learning to talk as we assume it will be easier for them to say than “Thanks” or “Thank you”.
    Because “Ta” isn’t used in America, Melanie’s children were taught “Thanks” straight off, followed by “Thank you” by the age of 2. My darling Kaitlyn is only 3 and has the cutest lisp, so everything sounds extra sweet coming from her.
    I’ve been thinking of the new “Jane Eyre” overnight. As Michael Fassbender is unknown to me as an actor, I didn’t bother to see it at the cinema. Is it worth hiring? Actually, I can’t remember the last time I rented a DVD! Oh, yes…it was “Haarry Potter mark 6”, just before no. 7 came out – saw that at the cinema.
    Hmmmm….I wasn’t so impressed with the character of Rochester when I was younger but I could be persuaded to give it a go.
    I’m still waiting to hear who that newish Scotland Yard detective is? Someone mentioned it as a possible future role for Richard? I just loved Morse and Wexford and Lynley and Gently, etc. I’m a sucker for British police stories as I believe the Brits do crime best. Sorry, America! I like some of yours…. but the British ones – WOW!

    • The comments area is running amok on me this evening. A Visual HTML format thingy keeps popping up and I can’t make it listen when it’s told to go away.

      Kathryn, it is the Charles Todd series, Inspector Rutledge series.

      Check http://.charlestodd.com/

       

  11. @CDoart, Raffles! Cary Grant – To Catch a Thief! Raffles would be delightful. And Julian Kestrel in knee breeches and satin frock coat. with a cello. I do like those suggestions!

     

  12. Hi CDoart,

    I keep asking the good Lord for more time but He hasn’t granted it yet.  I think He’s telling me “Everybody manages, Kathryn, so can you”!!!!  What do you reckon?

    Why is it that time flies when you’re having fun?  There are never enough hours in the day to fit all the good things in, are there?

    Please…what is the name of the Kestrel book?

    It is going on the reading list, too, as is the Knight one and the Dawsey Adams’ one. See, Judi, you’re not the only one who hasn’t read it!

    What has gone wrong with the font size on this darned computer?  Why is it suddenly so small?  And why do I get double-line spacing if I hit “enter”?

    You’ll go in the bin (trash, for you Americans – isn’t it great how multi-lingual I am?), you rotten computer!

    Gee, I’m going to get an earful when the darned thing can talk back!

      • Thank you.

        I’ve just been looking at the screencaps from “Captain America” – some of Richard’s expressions are really amazing! I’m most impressed that the capper (one who “caps”?) was able to get 300 stills!

  13. Hi CDoart, I keep asking the good Lord for more time but He hasn’t granted it yet.  I think He’s telling me “Everybody manages, Kathryn, so can you”!!!!  What do you reckon? Why is it that time flies when you’re having fun?  There are never enough hours in the day to fit all the good things in, are there? Please…what is the name of the Kestrel book? It is going on the reading list, too, as is the Knight one and the Dawsey Adams’ one. See, Judi, you’re not the only one who hasn’t read it! What has gone wrong with the font size on this darned computer?  Why is it suddenly so small?  And why do I get double-line spacing if I hit “enter”? You’ll go in the bin (trash, for you Americans – isn’t it great how multi-lingual I am?), you rotten computer! Gee, I’m going to get an earful when the darned thing can talk back!

  14. I’m cackling just like the Wicked Witch of the West…glad you can’t hear me!!!!

    Told you I was verbose, didn’t I? Just look at how many times I tried to get my reply to CDoart up on this blog!

    Glad it wasn’t my computer as it’s only 6 weeks old!

  15. I thought you might like to know that there actually is a picture where you can “discern the darn in the knee” of Thornton’s trousers which also reveals the heavy fabrics that his costume was made from.  See below from richardarmitagenet.com

    http://www.richardarmitagenet.com/images/gallery/nands/album/NandSPromo/album/NandSPromo21.jpg

    If I remember correctly from part 1 of the N&S interview he said, ” when you get into costume before the day starts – if they feel like costumes the creation of your character for that day  is somehow marred in some way”.  When you enlarge the above picture you really see what they look like and the first time I saw them up close I understood what he was talking about!

  16. Many thanks for that, Teuchter! I finally saw it from your reference. It had rather bugged me.

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