Serene Sunday: For Once in My Life

Got waylaid last week, but thanks to antibiotics I’m back on track. So here I am, awake at 12:48 AM on a Sunday morning waiting for the clocks to change to Daylight Savings Time (I’m pro) and sifting through YouTube for something “serene.”  Then I began reminiscing about my parents’ voluminous record collection and the ones I enjoyed.

For Once in My Life, as a song, isn’t technically in my top 10 list of best songs even though it’s been covered by many artists.  Even when Stevie Wonder popularized it in 1967, I never cared for the upbeat rendition.  Why?  Because Jean DuShon’s version had captivated me first.

According to our pal Wiki, the demo of the song was recorded as a ballad by Barbara McNair but first released by DuShon in 1966.  Then through DuShon lost the right to sing it.

“Jean DuShon was one of the singers who was originally tapped by Ron Miller to demo the song as he was fine-tuning the composition. Miller was impressed by DuShon’s rendition, and her version, produced by Esmond Edwards, was issued as a single on Chess Records’ Cadet label in October 1966. It was chosen “Pick Hit of the Week” by Detroit’s WXYZ radio. Although the record label gave the sole songwriting credit to Murden, Motown CEO Berry Gordy discovered that Miller – who was contracted to Motown – had co-written the song, and reportedly asked Chess not to promote the single.  DuShon dropped “For Once in My Life” from her nightclub act and later said: “It was a very big disappointment in my life. I stopped singing it ‘cause I didn’t have the song. I didn’t have anything. It wasn’t mine anymore.””

DuShon’s version was overshadowed and forgotten which is unfortunate.  It was DuShon’s powerhouse singing and the soaring orchestral arrangement that gave the lyrics the deep soulfulness it required.  Some people may prefer a simpler version but I’m a sucker for power ballads.   As the joke goes, “back in my day, singers could sing, and we liked it.”

By the way, my record was broken during the move.  Thank goodness for YouTube.

Enjoy.

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Serene Sunday: Oh Maria

Two of my favorite Whoopi Goldberg comedies are Sister Act and Sister Act 2 made in the early 1990s.  Goldberg plays a lounge singer in 1968 who is placed in protective custody as a convent nun in order to escape a mob boss.  Sister Act was popular, grossing 231 million worldwide.  The soundtrack album debuted at #74 and eventually reached #40 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart where it charted for 54 weeks.  Having attended parochial schools from the 8th grade starting in the early ’70’s (complete with nuns in full habit), this movie struck a chord with me. 

One of the issues facing the Catholic Church today is how to make religion relevant to current times.  In the movie, Whoopi as Delois, demonstrates one way by using music with a modern flair to attract young people to the church.   The resulting choir scene is fun.

Enjoy!

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Surreal Saturday: New Bibi Hendl

Since you couldn’t get enough of Takeo Ischi last week, I found another YouTube video to satisfy your fascination with this chicken yodeler.  He even has his own wiki page.   Here’s a snippet about this 69 year old wonder:

“Ischi was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan.  In high school, he was a loner, but it was during this time that he first heard yodeling on the radio.  Following his father, Ischi went to university for mechanical engineering. In his spare time he became engrossed with the zither and the hammered dulcimer, and learned to play these instruments. Using Franzl Lang‘s records, he taught himself to yodel, and began performing on Japanese television. During a six-month period where he studied abroad in Germany, Ischi went to Switzerland, where he sang at a beer hall in Zurich. He soon started earning money from this. From there he sang in front of Lang, his idol, and Lang took him under his wing. He performed on television with Maria Hellwig, and after that became known in German language circles as the “Japanese yodeler.”

Enjoy.

Takeo Ischi – New Bibi Hendl (Chicken Yodeling) 2011

Takeo Ischi – New Bibi Hendl (Chicken Yodeling) 2011 .. Yodelmeister Mister Takeo Ischi Wiar i bin auf d’Alm aufi ganga hab mer wolln mei Bibi-Henderl fange. Gel mei Bibi-Hendl, gel bi-bi gel mei Bibi-Hendl, jetzt duckst Di! (Jodeln) Wiar i bin im Wald aussi kemma ham’s ma wolln mei Bibi-Henderl nehma.

 

About This Dude

Courtesy of richardarmitagenet.com

I glanced at my WordPress dashboard and saw that this blog made it over the 500 posts mark at last – not a big deal when considering that it took six years.  Analytics tell me that I posted in concentrated spurts the first few years, ramping up to the wild and crazy time from 2012-2014.  But there were long periods when I didn’t post at all.  

During those silent times, my fangirling evolved.  Let me explain.  Having spent over 25 years in various fandoms,  I’ve experienced them as a process of phases.  The first phase we all have experienced – the giddiness of discovering a new crush with the accompanying squeeing and desire to find like-minded souls.  Then the girlishness progresses to an avid following.  The infatuation stays strong but a bit of the breathlessness tapers off. Finally, there’s the third stage when the ardor wanes and heads down one of two roads.  The first path leads out of fandom and fangirling – full stop – with the crush kicked to the curb.  The second way continues to hold interest in the crush’s work, but the initial passion is gone.

After six years, I’ve hit the third phase.  Mind you, I’ve not been the typical Richard Armitage fan. In fact, the ongoing joke has been me as an anti-fangurl who is the first to scream the emperor has no clothes.  (And I’ve been a pretty fab anti-fangurl I might add).  But alas, I’ve come to that fork in the road where the thrill is gone and I have to decide what happens next.  Don’t get me wrong.  I still like RA and enjoy his work.  And he’s still easy on the eyes.   But the lack of keen interest has made it difficult to blog about him as in the past.   So should I close shop and move on?  Should I direct my focus away from him?  Can I write about him occasionally?  If I stop, will I have any readership left?  Can the blog survive a transition? 

Most importantly, what becomes of The Man?  I’m not being funny here.  I enjoyed writing the series; it exercised my writing muscle and entertained the fan readership at the same time.  However, the inspiration behind the series *cough* may have been a certain actor *cough*.  Can I find the MIA muse and bring it back?  Will the readership stick around for fiction having nothing to do with their crush?  At this point, I have no answer to any of these questions.  There’s just a persistent feeling that something has to give.

I welcome feedback here.  Please let me know what you think or if there’s a happy compromise.

 

Serene Sunday: After Hours

When I was a child, my parents still listened to 78 rpm records.  (Now if you don’t know what those are, don’t feel bad.  Record companies had stopped pressing them by the time I was born.  That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. *Cough*)  

Anyway, I inherited the collection which included many jazz greats.  My favorite was “After Hours” performed by Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Stitt, and Sonny Rollins.  There was something about the sensuous horns and tinkling of the ivories that caught my attention.  The 78 version was a bit shorter than this LP version (remember those) found on YouTube.  Listen and you can see why these gentlemen were considered among the best at what they did.

So make some jazzy time and enjoy your Sunday.

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Surreal Saturday: Chicken Attack!

Alright then. That was one heck of long pause in scheduled programming.  I went to NYC in November to see Richard Armitage in Love, Love, Love and then – fell off the face of the earth.  During a strange mixture of after-trip fugue, post-election shock, holiday depression and winter doldrums, a strong reluctance to write.  This has been especially problematic since I’m taking a self-publishing course – only with no finished manuscript.  Cart before the horse much?

So what caused you to break through today, you ask.  Well, today would have been my usual Surreal Saturday and guys and gals, I just had to share my love of the bizarre with you and this video doesn’t disappoint.  I saw this Japanese yodeler in a previous video which I can’t find now but he’s back in another surreal but oddly catchy and mesmerizing one.  You’re going to love this. Trust me.  Watch to the end.

Enjoy!

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A Pause in Scheduled Programming

Yes I’m back from NYC (with no picante sauce).  Have been trying to get my thoughts together about Love, Love, Love but the political change has come as a shock.  However, this is the U.S. process and something I will have to accept.  I’m giving myself a little time to grieve and ruminate about where we’re heading and what I can do.  As soon as I sort things out, I’ll review the play and Richard Armitage’s performances.

In the meantime, here’s a video of the November 5, 2016 stage door.

11 5 2016 stage door

Love, Love, Love Stage Door November 5, 2016

Serene Sunday: Pachelbel’s Canon in D

We are five weeks from the start of the official holiday season in U.S.  Interestingly, Pachelbel’s Canon in D comes to mind because I usually hear it played around the holidays.  So who is Pachelbel and why is this piece heard at Christmas?  My old pal Wiki states the following:

“Pachelbel’s Canon is the name commonly given to a canon by the German Baroque composer Johann Pachelbel in his Canon and Gigue for 3 violins and basso continuo (German: Kanon und Gigue für 3 Violinen mit Generalbaß) (PWC 37, T. 337, PC 358), sometimes referred to as Canon and Gigue in D or simply Canon in D. Neither the date nor the circumstances of its composition are known (suggested dates range from 1680 to 1706), and the oldest surviving manuscript copy of the piece dates from the 19th century.

Pachelbel’s Canon, like Pachelbel’s other works, although popular during his lifetime, soon went out of style, and remained in obscurity for centuries thereafter. A 1968 arrangement and recording of it by the Jean-François Paillard chamber orchestra became unexpectedly popular over the next decade, and in the 1970s the piece began to be recorded by many ensembles; by the early 1980s its presence as background music was deemed inescapable.[1] From the 1970s to the early 2000s, elements of the piece, especially its chord progression, were used in a variety of pop music songs. Since the 1980s, it has also been used frequently in weddings and funeral ceremonies in the Western world.”

To paraphrase, Pachelbel was known as a composer and organist during his lifetime but today is known for his church and chamber music.  In 1968, the Jean-François Paillard chamber orchestra made a recording of the piece. A classical San Francisco radio played it in 1970 which garnered many requests.  In 1974, London Records, aware of the interest in the piece, reissued a 1961 album of the Corelli Christmas Concerto performed by the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, which happened to contain the piece, now re-titled to Pachelbel Kanon: the Record That Made it Famous and other Baroque Favorites.  The album was the highest-selling classical album of 1976.

And the rest, as they say, is history.  Enjoy.

pachelbel’s Canon in D–Soothing music(the best version)

Music Title: Canon in D Composer: J. Pachelbel Genre: Classic

 

Foolish Friday: About that Dude

Richard Armitage at an Epix event

Richard Armitage at an Epix event

In 2 1/2 months, I will celebrate my sixth blogiversary.  Needless to say, I’ve evolved as a fan of Richard Armitage.  Six years ago I enjoyed the rush of a newfound crush and seeking out his work, digging for pictures and videos, reading blogs, just being a typical fangurl.

Now, things have changed.  It’s not like I’m no longer fan – don’t get me wrong – I still like him.  However the euphoria has dissipated and I find myself more interested in the work than the man.  A long time can go by without even a thought. Then the PR starts to crank and I look forward to seeing an upcoming project like Berlin Station or Love, Love, Love in New York City.  I still participate in fandom but the reasons why I do so have changed.

But then a picture will come along and I’ll have to stop and look because – reasons.  I’ve not gone blind, you know.  *Cough.*

Enjoy.

Surreal Saturday: Scary Clowns

As you may have heard, creepy killer clown sightings have gone viral and caused enough hysteria that even Stephen King, (the author of the ultimate killer clown, Pennywise), has been trying to tamp things down. My friend posted about scary clowns of the political kind so I hoped to show you some scary killer clown videos but they were all much too disturbing.  Then I remembered before Pennywise in 1990, clowns were not a scary thing.  I grew up with Bozo from Bozo’s Circus televised from 1961 to 1980.  Watch a few moments of the 1968 episode.  He wasn’t scary, was he?

And let’s not forget the most famous international clown, Ronald McDonald and his strange little nemesis the Hamburglar.  Here’s a video from the 1980’s:

McDonald’s Hamburglar commercial 1986

Uploaded by Kevin Noonan on 2015-08-12.

Ronald never appealed to me probably because I was too old to enjoy the humor by the time he debuted.  But then, I wasn’t into Bozo either.  Clowns just weren’t that funny to me.   I devoured Pennywise, as I did all of King’s books; it never occurred to me that clowns could be scary.   Apparently many people think they are.

What do you think?

Surreal Saturday: Goodnight Internet [NSFW]

The Phantom openings tonight.  My volunteer stint is almost at an end.  In the meantime, I want to share this video with you because that’s the kind of gal I am.

Goodnight Internet.

Hot Guys Read A Bedtime Story

Sweet dreams. FEATURING Russell Jeffrey – @russelljeffrey (Instagram) Joe Almani Ajdin Sefer Eugene Lee Yang Gianni Lee Parody written by: Kelly Diamond @KellyDiamond_ Laura Bowes @LauraBowes Check out more awesome videos at BuzzFeedVideo! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo MUSIC Spread Your Wings Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc.

Foolish Friday: Sharing RA with the World

Welcome back to Foolish Friday, class!  I know it’s been gone a long time, but it’s taken me this long to remember what I did on Fridays.  But thanks to Bare-ChestedGate,  my memory jogged and we can return to our regularly scheduled objectifying. Yes!

I just read that Richard Armitage has topped 70,000 followers on Weibo.  In my eminently prepared style, I have no idea what Weibo is but assume it’s popular with non-English speakers. This got me to feeling slightly wistful that our RA has truly been discovered by the world; he’s no longer the obscure actor known only by the UK and its allies (unless that 70,000 are the same people on Twitter).  We can no longer think of him as our little secret (well, except me).  Our boy has burst forth from his cocoon and stands ready to fly away.  That bit of overwrought prose had me looking through photos of the younger RA, when he was happy to get a small part.  Thankfully, the younger RA offered prime objectifying material.  Let’s have a look class.

This is Himself as Lee Preston in Cold Feet.  While it’s not that picture, this rarely posted shot has a lot to offer.  Notice the laid back youthfulness on the cusp of a man in his prime.  The smoothness of the chest and abs contrasting with the hairiness of the forearms and reminding us that he waxes.  The firmness of the jawline.  Although people joke about speedos, I developed a new appreciation with his.  Must have been the color.

Need to run and continue production work.  Your homework is to find other aspects in this picture that the world needs to know.  I know you can do it.

Richard Armitage as Lee in Cold Feet.

Richard Armitage as Lee in Cold Feet. Courtesy richardarmitagenet.com

 

Interlude XLVI: Objectify Guy

We’re now ramping up production on Phantom of the Opera.  Fifty-two talents each with four costume changes.  The sets need erecting.  Mary Ellen and Ellen are stressed to the max, the seamstress hasn’t arrived, and I’m flailing around taking notes and plugging up holes popping up left and right.  And it isn’t even rehearsal week yet.   Good grief.

It’s so crazy a gal could use some objectifying, so why not my favorite go-to – Guy of Gisborne. Hey, had it not been for this bad load of pretty, I wouldn’t have discovered Richard Armitage.

Enjoy.

Guy demonstrates to Marian how semi-nudity is integral to the story, Courtesty of richardarmitagenet.com

Guy demonstrates to Marian how semi-nudity is integral to the story, Courtesy of richardarmitagenet.com

Repost: The Genesis of Perving

[There was a recent to-do on Facebook that publication of half nude pictures of Richard Armitage from The Crucible were allegedly “objectifying” and “disrespectful.”  It wasn’t the first time the complaints arose and won’t be the last, although critics seem to assume their protests have never before been heard.  Four years ago, I wrote this piece about objectification after some fans complained, among a list of other things that supposedly didn’t honor him.  It elicited such a nice discussion and so many hits that it would be nice to start a new dialogue.]

*****

A anthropology student alerted me to the following tweet posted on allthingsrarmitage:

“Callipygian is a word coined by the ancient Greeks (‘kallipygos’) that means ‘having beautiful buttocks.” This picture was associated with that reference:

ultimate force arse shot

A nice example of beautiful buttocks.   Courtesy RichardArmitageNet.com

This screen capture is of course Richard Armitage in Ultimate Force.  Ancient Greeks would say he is quite callipygian.  Now this type of talk in the modern age raises protests of objectification.  My question is: why does that have to be so?

Ancient antiquity has always depicted nude image and statues of the human form.

nudes

(l) Greek male nude (r) Replica of nude male wrestlers. Both quite nude. Courtesy of Greek Museum Authority

The human form has always been considered a source of nature beauty, sculpted and painted for ages.  It’s certainly safe to say that because artists could not take actual human being and freeze them in time, they froze them through other media.  The following picture of Michelangelo’s “David,” sculpted circa 1501, is considered a masterpiece:

michelangelo david

Michelangelo’s “David.” Courtesy of Galleria dell’Accademia, Florence

Millions of tourists flock to see this statue.  Nobody would say (other than the must repressed prurient type) that it’s improper to admire and even study this work of art.  People would certainly say “David” is callipygian even though it’s an idealized medieval depiction of a human male.  Nobody could convincingly argue that Michelangelo objectified the human form unless they believe that all nudity is inappropriate.  Since that’s not my premise, I won’t answer that argument since it takes us down the road of morality and personal taste which I’m not discussing here.

So why do fans become uncomfortable when viewing this picture?  It caused quite a stir when first published:

RA as Lucas festooned in tatoos

Richard Armitage as Lucas festooned in tattoos. Would you say this form isn’t view-worthy? Courtesy RichardArmitageNet.com

I observe similar lines and muscles depicted in the idealized statues.  If fact, the real human form is more beautiful because it shows the real flawed form, not simply an idealization.  Does viewing his form suddenly become objectification because he’s a living man?  Is it improper to also say he’s callipygian here?  I argue no.

Sexual objectification arises when a person is viewed as an sexual object or only as one. I have yet to find any fan forum where RA’s artistry and personality isn’t also discussed in detail.  He is not seen solely as an object of lust.  However, it’s self-delusional to say that he shouldn’t be viewed as the sexy man he is.  Human beings are sexual creatures; this is how we have the drive to reproduce our species (or not, as the case may be).  We are hard-wired to perv each other. We sexually objectify each other to a degree on an instinctual level.  We view the human form as desirable and have since probably cave man times.   This form has been frankly depicted since antiquity.  The fact that the modern media makes it possible to photograph the human form in real time doesn’t change anything.

I’m always amused when women protest the loudest that men should not be objectified because it implies a hypocrisy in protesting against female objectification.  I have problems with female objectification only to the extent that it’s used for exploitation.  When that’s not the case, I have no issue if Halle Berry’s fans consider her the epitome of beauty.  Conversely I have no problem with male objectification and feel no shame and admiring male beauty. Is RA being exploited?  He is a grown man who made informed choices to appear in roles requiring undress.  I don’t believe it’s for us to question his judgment as to whether that undress was integral to the story or gratuitous.  I’m comfortable respecting his decisions as to whether he considers himself exploited or not. I can safely assume he would not take a role he deemed exploitative. Even if he did, it was still his decision.  So, I feel free to say that RA’s is callipygian in particular and gorgeous in general without any need to justify.

Here’s an absolutely callipygian screen cap:

Between the Sheets

Richard Armitage as Paul in Between the Sheets. Callipygian, no? My screen cap.

RA arse shot

Very callipygian. Yes? Richard Armitage as Lucas North. Donated artistic screen cap.

 

What, no? Does it really make a difference that this is a screen cap of a real man playing a fictional role in a fictional series?  What if RA decided to pose nude as himself?  I don’t think this picture is less worthy of being admired than if a sculptor made an approved marble statue of his bum or his body and placed it in a museum.  As a straight sexual female, I will admire his body no matter what form it took.

I’m amused every time the objectification issue arises.  When the above tatted picture surfaced, fans drooled but always rushed to add they also admired RA’s work and personality lest they be accused of objectification, although this was understood by everybody.  I find all this protestation unnecessary.  It’s time to drop that veil of political correctness and just be honest as fans.  We like to look up RA’s form because it’s beautiful and desirable.

Just say so.  Period. We understand the rest.

 

 

Interlude XLV: No Rest for the Busy

We’ve almost finished building the scenery for The Snow Queen production this weekend.  More work tomorrow.  Sleep seems like a good idea.

Apropos of nothing, I was searching for one of my favorite pics of Guy tied up (how many times does that happen anyway) and came across this one.  Kind of looks like a scene from Season 4 –  The Sir Guy of Gisborne Show.  Televised after the family hour time slot, naturally. Really late.   Really really late.

Guy nightmareep6_0013

Guy is either having a bad nightmare or a lovely time. Courtesy richardarmitagenet.com

 

Interlude XLIV: Man at Work

Sadly at the home under the weather today.  The upside is that I can concentrate on writing.  Since my 4th blogversary passed December 28th, I may have something to share tomorrow.

What’s not to love about this pic of Richard Armitage?  There’s the longer hair, the long side burns, the stubble, the profile, the smile -did I mention the LONGER HAIR? (Call me old school, but he looks better with some hair to soften the angular face.)  Most of all, he’s at work, showing us a bit of the magic.

Enjoy.

Richard Armitage reading Hamlet, Prince of Denmark: A Novel. Courtesy of A.J. Hartley

Richard Armitage reading Hamlet, Prince of Denmark: A Novel. Courtesy of A.J. Hartley

Serene Sunday: Kyrie

I’m behind in writing again.  While looking for the Catholic hymn “Kyrie,” I came upon this song “Kyrie Eleison” by Mr. Mister.  “Kyrie, eleison” (or “Lord, have mercy”) is a liturgical response of the people to intentions mentioned in the Prayer of the Faithful.  Mr. Mister used the phrase for this 1985 hit.  Even though I’m no longer Christian, it’s spiritual message somehow strikes a chord.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie

The wind blows hard against this mountainside
Across the sea into my soul
It reaches into where I cannot hide
Setting my feet upon the road

My heart is old, it holds my memories
My body burns a gem-like flame
Somewhere between the soul and soft machine
Is where I find myself again

Kýrie, eléison
Down the road that I must travel
Kýrie, eléison
Through the darkness of the night

Kýrie, eléison
Where I’m going, will you follow?
Kýrie, eléison
On a highway in the light

When I was young, I thought of growing old
Of what my life would mean to me
Would I have followed down my chosen road
Or only wished what I could be

Kýrie, eléison
Down the road that I must travel
Kýrie, eléison
Through the darkness of the night

Kýrie, eléison
Where I’m going, will you follow?
Kýrie, eléison
On a highway in the light

Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh

Kýrie, eléison
Down the road that I must travel
Kýrie, eléison
Through the darkness of the night

Kýrie, eléison
Where I’m going, will you follow?
Kýrie, eléison
On a highway in the light

Kýrie, eléison
Down the road that I must travel (will you follow?)
Kýrie, eléison
Through the darkness of the night

Kýrie, eléison
Where I’m going, will you follow? (will you follow)
Kýrie, eléison
On a highway in the light

Kýrie, eléison
Down the road that I must travel (yeah)
Kýrie, eléison
Through the darkness of the night

Kýrie, eléison
Where I’m going, will you follow? (will you follow?)
Kýrie, eléison
On a highway in the light

Kýrie, eléison
Down the road that I must travel (will you follow?)
Kýrie, eléison
Through the darkness of the night

Kýrie, eléison
Where I’m going, will you follow? (will you follow)

Enjoy.

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Kyrie Eleison, which means “Lord, have mercy”

Surreal Saturday: Blogging Is Non-Habit Forming

clockSo I just missed the deadline for yesterday’s post.  Ordinarily I write for the next day but this time, I’ve been leaving things until the night of that day’s post.  Oddly since retiring, I’ve not fallen into a routine.  Before, I fit my life into the limited free available after work.  Blogging didn’t pose such a big problem; a three hour post-dinner deadline always loomed.  Now with all the time in the world – you’d think I would write reams.  That’s not been the case.  After 25 years working, it’s hilarious to develop time management problems in retirement.  This goes back to an issue I touched on last year.  I spent my time always reacting to negative motivation on the job (i.e., work deadlines, micromanaging etc).   Now I have to be proactive; all the impetus must come from within.  But that’s one of the problems with/recovering from depression – finding the mysterious self-motivation.

Then I wonder about other people with illnesses who seem to have no problem in the respect.  People like Stephen Fry who acts, produces, lectures, hosts, blogs, geeks, writes, advocates and seemingly has his fingers in every UK entertainment pie despite being bi-polar.  Closer to home, The Bloggess, Jenny Lawson writes books and a hilarious bawdy off-kilter blog even with depressive and anxiety disorders.  Both of these people manage to regiment their time quite well.  Are they juggling many balls to stay ahead of their illnesses, or is The Secret keeping busy and productive with many things.

Maybe I’m suffering from too much time on my hands.

Since you made it this far, here’s a treat – a man who doesn’t have enough time on his hands.  I’d love to ask him about time management.

Enjoy.

 

Richard Armitage photo by Robert Ashcroft

Richard Armitage photo by Robert Ashcroft