The Christmas Surprise Is Here!

The big day has come.  It’s time to roll out the surprise!

Remember a certain “scenic” short story I secretly posted a while ago?  Turns out that was only an except.  Yes, Dear Reader, I actually wrote an entire plot around it which transformed into a fanfic complete with conflict, intrigue and er… more scenery.  It rolls out in eight chapters starting today and ending New Year’s day.  It was a challenge to myself to see if I could do it; it’s been an interesting experience.  It’s also the longest piece I’ve ever done.  I hope you enjoy it.

Password: What was the color of Guy’s wedding cravat?  Keep it simple!

The Christmas Surprise Is Almost Here!

The Christmas surprise is buffed and ready to go.  Hmm, what could it possibly be about?    And what could be the brain-wracking password?  Here is a clue:

It might be about this dude. (courtesy RichardArmitageNet.com)

The password is: What was the color of Guy’s wedding cravat?  This is too easy.  Remember, you’ll need it for tomorrow.

 

The Christmas Surprise Is Coming!

Yes, the Christmas surprise is shaking off the dust (since it’s been complete for weeks) and readying for a wardrobe walkthrough (read: heavy duty prepping).  After much consideration, the surprise will be completely password protected. Ooer!  More news about it tomorrow, so watch this space.

What's the surprise? Stay tuned! (courtesy RichardArmitageNet.com)

 

Interlude XIV – A Low Ballin’ We Go

You shouldn’t be surprised when I say I’ve failed to be carried away in the er… RA frenzy of the past few days (sorry Frenzy). Don’t get me wrong. I enjoyed the Christmas Hobbit trailer and thought Richard Armitage will be splendid as Thorin.  I’m actually looking forward to the movie which surprises me, considering I’ve never been a fan of LOTR.  It’s just that I’m not a hard core fan.  Instead I feel like a buddha leaning back and sagely smiling, watching the fine sweet (sort of) young man on his way to The Big Time while his fandom squeals and faints and carries on.  (I prefer the buddha analogy better than being a wet blanket.  Actually the squealing part looks like a lot of fun; sometimes it’s a pain being so – soft core.)

Thankfully, my low key Interlude series this month has kept me under the RA seeking internet radar.  The idea that hordes might descend on my site like they have on Frenzy’s, Callie’s and Servetus’s frankly makes me a little squicky. Do I really want oodles of people reading my blog?  Do I want to be fingered for a “Fan” rather than a “fan?”  I started this venture to tap into my creativity again,  not to be a fan blog per se, even though I do cater to you, Dear Reader, keeping in mind what you really come here for.  Will it possible in the future to low ball a blog if the subject happens to be RA?   It’s making me ponder what a booming fandom will be like and my place in it (or not).  It’s definitely a question I’ve never before had to consider in any fandom.  Watching the next two years unfold will be interesting indeed.

Speaking of low balling, how about a character of another kind, Lee in Cold Feet?  Fine and slick, maybe too slick.  Certainly the kind of guy to avoid with a 10 foot pole.  Did I mention he was fine?

 

Richard Armitage as Lee in Cold Feet, courtesy RichardArmitageNet.com

 

Serene Sunday – O Holy Night

Since my Christmas surprise begins next Sunday and runs for eight days, this is the last holiday Serene Sunday this month.  So, I’ll end with my favorite Christmas carol, O Holy Night.  According to my fave go-to wealth of information, Wiki:

O Holy Night” (“Cantique de Noël“) is a well-known Christmas carol composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem “Minuit, chrétiens” (Midnight, Christians) by Placide Cappeau (1808–1877), a wine merchant and poet, who had been asked by a parish priest to write a Christmas poem. Unitarian ministerJohn Sullivan Dwight, editor of Dwight’s Journal of Music, created a singing edition based on Cappeau’s French text in 1855. In both the French original and in the two familiar English versions of the carol, the text reflects on the birth of Jesus and of mankind’s redemption.

I’ve always loved this carol, not for the words, but for the slow beautiful melody usually performed with strings and a very good vocalist.  My iPod has at least 15 renditions of various artists ranging from simple to power singing.  Here are my top three favorites by Johnny Mathis, Josh Groban, and Celine Dion.  Which one do you prefer?

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Josh Groban – O Holy Night (Cover by Tyler)

Uploaded by MrSoundCheck1 on 2011-12-01.

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